Treasure Coast Moving And Storage
 
 
 
 
 
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Moving Tools and Tips for Moving in the South East Coast of Florida


Moving Checklist


Moving checklist – moving reminders
Sign up for Mayflower's free Interactive Moving Guide today!

There's so much to take care of when planning and executing your move that it can be easy to overlook important details. Mayflower is pleased to offer this handy checklist for moving so that you can plan your move efficiently. Follow the steps outlined in each section of this checklist for moving and you'll enjoy a successful move!
Download our Moving Checklist below and check off the steps as you go!
Moving checklist – six to eight weeks before moving day
Working with the mover:
  • Call Treasure Coast to set a date for the agent to visually survey your home and prepare a moving estimate.
  • If your company is paying for your move, refer to their moving policy to determine the services the mover will be authorized to perform.
  • Do you want to do any of the packing — or will you have it done by our experienced packers? Your agent will be happy to discuss packing services with you.
  • Show the agent everything that is going to be moved. Any items you fail to disclose or that are added later to the shipment will increase the cost, even if you have been given a binding estimate.
  • Read the “Your Rights and Responsibilities Manual” to make certain that you fully understand the extent of the carrier's liability.
  • Sign the Estimate/Order for Service after you are sure you have a clear understanding of each section. If you have any questions, ask your agent to explain.
  • Keep the phone number and name of your salesperson or move coordinator handy.
Moving list – four to six weeks before moving day
Places to notify:
  • Notify the post office that you are moving. An online Change of Address form is available on the United States Postal Service Web site.
  • Prepare a list of friends, relatives, business firms and others who should be notified of your move. The following checklist will be helpful:
 
  • Utilities
  • Personal Accounts
  • Electric Pharmacy
  • Gas Dry Cleaner
  • Water Lawn Service
  • Telephone Bank/Finance Companies
  • Sewer District Credit Card Companies
  • Trash Laundry Service
 
  • Cable/Satellite Auto Finance Company
  • Fuel (Oil/Propane) Health Club
  • Sewer District
  • Professional Services Publications
  • Doctor(s) Newspapers
  • Dentist Magazines
  • Accountant Newsletters
  • Lawyer Professional Journals
 
  • Broker
  • Insurance Agency
  • Government Offices
  • Department of Motor Vehicles
  • Social Security Administration
  • State/Federal Tax Bureaus
  • City/County Tax Assessor
  • Veterans Administration
 
Miscellaneous:
  • Have a “garage sale” or use an online auction service to dispose of unwanted items. Ask your agent for a copy of our “Let a Garage Sale Lighten the Load” booklet.
  • Donate unwanted clothing or household goods to charitable organizations. Obtain receipts showing the items’ approximate value for possible tax deductions.
  • Begin to use up supplies of canned goods, frozen foods and other household items. Buy only what will be used before moving.
Moving checklist – two to three weeks before moving day
Working with the mover:
  • Notify your agent if you add or subtract items from your planned move or if there are any changes in dates. Be sure to supply your agent with destination address and phone numbers where you can be reached.
  • Confirm any extra stops required to pick up or deliver goods to a location other than the main pickup or delivery points.
  • If your car is being moved, be prepared to drive it to a suitable loading site. Also be prepared to pick up your car at a suitable destination location.

Preparing the family:

  • Take the family for a farewell visit to some of the places that hold happy memories.
  • Have a going-away party for the children and their friends.
  • Have some fun for yourself…an open house or an informal dinner or barbecue. Keep it simple.
  • Make family travel plans. Reserve hotel rooms and airline tickets as needed.
  • If driving, have your car serviced for the trip (check tires, brakes and windshield wipers, fluids, belts, etc.)

Preparing household items:

Federal law requires that you dispose of flammables such as fireworks, cleaning fluids, matches, acids, chemistry sets, aerosol cans, ammunition, and poisons such as weed killer. Drain fuel from your power mower and other machinery. Discard partly used cans of oil, paint, thinner, bleach, or any other substances that may be flammable or combustible or those stored in containers that may leak. Please read the complete list of non-allowables.
  • Discard propane tanks which are used for barbecue grills.
  • Set an appointment with a service technician to prepare your major appliances for shipment — or have your agent send someone out who is authorized to perform this service.
  • Set a date for having utilities disconnected. If possible, plan to keep utilities in service through moving day.
  • Have rugs and draperies cleaned. Leave both wrapped when they are returned from the cleaners.
  • Obtain a written appraisal of antique items to verify value. Avoid waxing or oiling wooden antiques (and fine wood furniture) before moving because some products might soften the wood, making it vulnerable to imprinting from furniture pads.
  • Do not clean your upholstered furniture before moving. Moisture could cause mold if furniture must be placed in storage.
Moving checklist – one to two weeks before moving day
Pet and plants:
  • Decide what to do with house plants. Mayflower cannot safely move your plants because they may suffer from lack of water and light as well as probable temperature changes while in the van.

Alternatives:

  • Give plants to friends or relatives.
  • Donate plants to a hospital or other organization.
  • Include plants in a garage sale.
  • Some states permit the entry of all house plants; others admit them in accordance with specific rules and regulations.
  • Take pets to the veterinarian. Most states require health certificates and rabies inoculations. See that identification and rabies tags are securely attached to your pet’s collar.
  • Arrange for transportation of pets. Take them in the car or send via air. Consider boarding pets either at destination or at a kennel near your present home until you are settled in the new city.

Other important details:

  • Collect all items that are being cleaned, stored or repaired (clothing, furs, shoes, watches, etc.). Empty your locker at the club, bowling alley or gym.
  • Return library books and anything borrowed from friends or neighbors, and collect things you may have loaned.
Moving checklist – day before moving day
Working with the packers:
  • Point out to the packers any extra-fragile items needing special attention. Mark appropriately any items you do not want packed or moved, as well as cartons you will want first when the van arrives at destination.
  • If you are doing your own packing, make sure everything is ready to go before moving day. Upon arrival, the van operator will check to see if boxes have been properly packed.
  • Collect things you definitely want packed together, such as children’s toys, and place in separate groups.
  • Unplug all electronic appliances 24 hours in advance of a move, except plasma televisions, so that they will be at room temperature on moving day. This includes home computers, stereos, and audio/video equipment. Ask your agent for a copy of our “If There’s a Home Computer in Your Move… ” booklet.

Last minute details:

  • Check closets, cabinets, and storage lockers for any articles overlooked.
  • Be on hand when the service representative arrives to prepare your appliances for shipment.
  • It is your responsibility to see that all mechanical and electrical equipment is properly serviced for shipping prior to the arrival of the moving van at your expense. If you have failed to have an article serviced, the van operator may load and haul it but will mark the inventory sheet “Not Serviced.”

Working with the mover:

  • It is your responsibility to see that all of your goods are loaded, so remain on the premises until loading is complete. After making a final tour of the house, check and sign the inventory. Get your copy from the van operator and keep it.
  • Approve and sign the Bill of Lading/Freight Bill. It states the terms and conditions under which your goods are moved and is also your receipt for the shipment. Be sure to complete and sign the declared valuation statement.
  • Complete and sign the High-Value Inventory form, whether or not items of extraordinary value are included in the shipment. You also need to sign and date the “Extraordinary (Unusual) Value Article Declaration” box on the Bill of Lading, if applicable to your shipment.
  • Make sure the van operator has the exact destination address. Be sure to let the van operator know how you can be reached, including phone numbers, pending the arrival of your household goods.

Last-minute details:

  • Leave your phone connected throughout moving day. After the van leaves and you finish last-minute calls, be sure to pack the phone in one of your suitcases.

Take a last look around:

  • Water shut off?
  • Furnace and air conditioner shut off?
  • Light switches turned off?
  • All utilities arranged for disconnection?
  • Windows shut and locked?
  • Old house keys surrendered?
  • Have you left anything?
Moving checklist – delivery day
Working with the mover:
  • Be on hand to accept delivery. If you cannot be there personally, be sure you authorize an adult to be your representative to accept delivery and pay the charges for you.
  • On the day of delivery, the van operator will attempt to contact you by phone and/or will make an appearance at residence if he is unable to reach you. If you are unable to accept delivery of your shipment within the free waiting time (i.e., two hours) after notification of arrival at destination, you may request waiting time until delivery can be made.
  • Check your household goods as they are unloaded. If there is a change in the condition of the property from that noted on the inventory at the time of loading or if any items are missing, note discrepancies on the van operator’s copy of the inventory sheet. By signing the inventory sheet, you are acknowledging receipt of all items listed. Personally report any loss or damage to your salesperson or move coordinator.
  • When unloading, each piece of furniture will be placed as you direct, including the laying of rugs and setting up any beds disassembled at origin. However, mattresses will not be unpacked, and appliances and/or fixtures will NOT be installed. At your request and at an additional charge, your salesperson or move coordinator can arrange for this service. The mover is not obligated to rearrange your furniture.
  • Place a floor plan of your new home by the entrance, which the movers can use to determine where each piece of furniture should go.
  • Keep all documents pertaining to your move in a safe place. You will need them for verification of moving expenses when you file your federal income tax returns.
  • To prevent possible damage, television sets, other electronic equipment and major appliances should not be used for 24 hours after delivery, allowing them time to adjust to room temperature.
Moving checklist – one week after move
Settling in:
  • Check with your new post office for any mail being held and ask for delivery to start.
  • Check state (and local) requirements for auto registration and a driver’s license.
  • You may want to select an attorney to discuss laws that pertain to your destination state, county, and/or city. Be sure to cover such matters as wills, transfers of property and investments, insurance regulations, inheritance laws, taxes, etc. Most laws affect a family as soon as residence in the new state and city is established.

Having followed the steps in this moving list, you’ll find yourself avoiding the stress and frustration that can arise without proper planning.
 

Moving FAQ's


Moving information – frequently asked questions
The key to a smooth move is organization. Based on our years of experience, we have combined a series of frequently asked questions to assist you in organizing and planning your next move.

Mayflower has structured its frequently asked questions into four segments to assist you in finding your answers as quickly as possible.
The four areas are:
  • Let's get started
  • Understanding what things cost
  • Questions about my belongings
  • Items that we can't move
Let's get started:
  • When should I call a moving company?
  • Do I need an estimate?
  • What is a binding estimate?
  • When is the best time to move?
  • How long does it take to move?
  • Is a moving company “licensed?”
  • How do you determine what my move will cost?
  • What is a tariff?
When should I call a moving company?
The earlier, the better. Although the actual van assignment may not be made until a few days before your move, it's wise to give your moving company from four to six week's notice, if possible. The more lead time you can give, the more likely we will be able to meet your preferred delivery schedule.

All moving companies, for their standard type of service, require alternate pickup and delivery dates. We'll do our best, of course, to comply with the dates you prefer or the nearest possible alternatives. You will be notified in advance of the loading date for your goods and of the estimated date of arrival.

If your pickup and delivery dates are critical due to such factors as a lease expiration or a real estate closing, you may choose an extra-cost service which will enable us to accommodate a more precise, reasonable schedule. You should discuss your specific pickup and delivery requirements with your Mayflower agent, who can advise you regarding the types and costs of services available.
Do I need an estimate?
A Mayflower agent will make a pre-move survey of your household goods to be transported. A pre-move survey is needed to determine the approximate cost of a move and the amount of van space your goods will occupy. Your Mayflower agent will compute the approximate cost and give you a written Estimate/Order for Service. An accurate estimate cannot be calculated without a visual survey of the goods to be moved. There is no charge for the estimate.

Keep in mind that estimates (household goods surveys) are only guidelines. On interstate shipments, you must pay the total charges as determined by the actual weight of your shipment, the distance it travels, and the services that you authorize or which become necessary to handle your shipment.

Charges for local shipments are generally calculated on an hourly basis. There may be a minimum number of hours required. These shipments are handled by the local moving company, not the interstate carrier.
What is a binding estimate?
A binding estimate or binding cost of service specifies in advance the precise cost of the move based on the services requested or deemed necessary at the time of the estimate. If additional services are requested or required at origin or destination (such as a “shuttle” from a location to which a full-size van cannot operate directly), the total cost will increase. Binding estimates are valid for the time period specified, up to 30 days.

If you add items to be moved or require additional services, such as packing, between the time of the estimate and the time of your move, there will be additional charges. An addendum specifying these additional charges will be prepared for your signature.

If you are interested in obtaining a binding estimate, please discuss it with your Mayflower agent.
When is the best time to move?
If there is a choice, most moving companies suggest you select a time other than summer, the end of the month or the end-of-year holidays. The heaviest demands are placed on vans, equipment and personnel during these periods.

However, Mayflower believes you should move when it is most convenient for you. Factors involved in the decision may include:
  • whether the move must be made immediately
  • moving children during the school term
  • separation of the family while the move is under way
If the move can be scheduled for a time when vans and trained personnel are more readily available, we'll be better able to meet your preferred delivery schedule.

How long does it take to move?
This depends on many factors, such as the time of year, weather conditions, size of your shipment, time required to load and unload, and the direction and distance your shipment is traveling.

Because the furnishings of the average household will not fill a van, it is often necessary for two or more shipments to be loaded on the same van. Each shipment is carefully sectioned off from the others.

With the help of Mayflower's computer-assisted dispatching system, pickup and delivery dates are scheduled according to the origins and destinations of individual shipments on the van, as well as shipment weight.

Is a moving company “licensed?”
It would be more accurate to say that a moving company is “registered.” For example, Mayflower has been issued a certificate of authority by the federal government to move household goods among any of the 50 states. As a motor carrier, Mayflower has maintained a certificate of authority with the US Department of Transportation (DOT) since September 27, 1988.

A local moving company (“agency”) affiliated with a national van line such as Mayflower may also be registered with the DOT to move interstate shipments within certain geographical areas.

How do you determine what my move will cost?
Unless you have been given a binding estimate, the exact cost of your move cannot be determined until after your shipment has been loaded on the van and weighed. If additional services are requested or become necessary after loading and weighing, additional charges will be incurred. Basic transportation charges depend on the actual weight of your goods and the distance they will travel. The total cost will include these transportation costs, any charges for SmoothSail Protection (Full-Value Protection) or Released Value (see “Am I Protected Against Loss Or Damage While My Goods Are In Transit?”), plus charges for any “accessorial” services (such as packing and unpacking) performed by the Mayflower agent at your request. These charges are based on “tariff” rate schedules.

What is a tariff?
This is the list of rules, regulations, available services and resulting charges used by all motor carriers which provide interstate transportation of household goods. The tariffs are published by each household goods motor carrier and include its various services. The tariffs are available for your inspection upon request.

Understanding what things cost.
  • How and when should I pay?
  • Am I protected against loss or damage while my goods are in transit?
  • SmoothSail Protection (Full-Value Protection)
  • Released Value – basic coverage
  • Items of “extraordinary value”

How and when should I pay?
Tariff provisions require that all charges be paid before your shipment is unloaded at destination (unless prior arrangements have been made for later billing).Payment for your Mayflower shipment can be made by one of the following methods: cash, traveler's check, money order or cashier's check. In addition, the American Express® Card, DiscoverSM Card, Visa® or MasterCard® can be used to pay for interstate moves only, with advance approval required prior to loading (unless other billing arrangements have been made). Personal checks are not accepted.All payment forms apply to both binding and non-binding estimates.If you have received a non-binding estimate and your actual moving costs exceed the estimate, you will be required to pay no more than 110% of the estimated cost at delivery. Should your actual costs exceed the estimate by more than 10%, you will be given 30 days after delivery to pay the amount over 110%.

Payment of estimated charges plus 10% does not apply if goods are delivered into storage. If storage at destination (storage-in-transit) is necessary, all transportation charges must be paid at time of delivery of the shipment to the warehouse. You will then be assessed storage charges based on the applicable rates set forth in our tariff.

Am I protected against loss or damage while my goods are in transit?

Yes, but how much protection you have and its cost to you depend upon the Mayflower “valuation” program you choose – SmoothSail Protection (Full-Value Protection) or Released Value (60 cents per pound per article).

The valuation option you select determines the basis upon which any claim will be adjusted and establishes the maximum liability of Mayflower. The liability of Mayflower for loss or damage is based upon Mayflower's tariffs, as well as federal laws and regulations, and has certain limitations and exclusions. Valuation is not insurance; it is simply a tariff-based level of motor carrier liability. If you desire insurance, you should consult your insurance company representative about available insurance coverages, because Mayflower does not offer insurance.

SmoothSail Protection (Full-value protection)
Under this protection plan, if any article is lost, destroyed or damaged while under Mayflower's interstate authority, it will either 1) repair the article to the extent necessary to restore it to the same condition as when it was received by Mayflower, or pay you for the cost of such repairs; or 2) replace the article with an article of like kind and quality, or pay you for the cost of such a replacement. An additional charge applies for this option. Mayflower will determine the appropriate settlement method to be used.

Released Value – basic coverage
With this type of valuation, Mayflower's maximum liability for loss or damage to any article in the shipment is 60 cents multiplied by the weight of the article. This is the basic liability level and is provided at no charge.

Items of “extraordinary value”
In the moving industry, items having a value of more than $100 per pound are known as “articles of extraordinary value.” All “articles of extraordinary value” in your shipment must be listed on the High Value Inventory Form which will be given to you by the salesperson to complete. An online copy is also available. Although you might have other articles of extraordinary value, the following list should help you identify items that might fall under this classification: jewelry, furs, art and coin collections, crystal, figurines, antiques, Oriental rugs, precious stones or gems, china and silverware. In the event of a claim, any settlement involving an article of extraordinary value listed on the High Value Inventory Form is limited to the value of the article, not to exceed the declared value of the shipment, based upon the Mayflower valuation program applicable to your shipment. If an article of extraordinary value is not listed on the form, Mayflower's maximum liability is limited to $100 per pound per article. If you are not shipping any items of high value, sign the form and print the word “None” in the inventory list.

Shipments that move under the Released Value Liability program, in which the declared value of the shipment would be 60 cents per pound per article, would not be covered by the provisions applicable to articles of extraordinary value. The High Value Inventory Form should still be signed with the words “Not Applicable” written on the form.

You must select the valuation program, and you must write your choice in the “Valuation” box on the Bill of Lading in your own handwriting.

For a full description of the SmoothSail Protection (Full Value Protection or FVP) and Released Value Liability programs, please ask your Mayflower agent.

Questions about my belongings
  • Can my possessions be stored temporarily?
  • Will my furnishings remain clean?
  • Do my appliances need special attention?
  • Can I pack my china, glass and crystal?
  • Can I pack my clothes in a chest or dresser drawers?

Can my possessions be stored temporarily?
If you are unable to take immediate possession of your new residence, your belongings can be stored in a local Mayflower agent's warehouse. Mayflower agents throughout the world provide safe storage facilities for holding your goods until you're ready for them. However, you are responsible for the storage charges, warehouse valuation coverage and final delivery charges from the warehouse.If your goods are placed in storage, there will be an additional charge for the valuation or insurance coverage provided for your shipment, as mentioned previously. The type of coverage and cost will depend upon whether the shipment is held in storage-in-transit (temporary) or in permanent (long-term) storage. Please ask your Mayflower agent for information regarding storage arrangements.

Will my furnishings remain clean?
Mayflower protects your upholstered furniture with ClearGuardSM, a clear plastic material, before they are wrapped with furniture pads.

Do my appliances need special attention?
Most refrigerators, washers, dryers, and other electrical or mechanical appliances require special servicing to ensure safe transportation. Any moving parts such as motors on major appliances, washer drums, and icemakers should be securely fastened for shipment. Gas appliances need to be serviced and disconnected prior to your move.

It is the owner's responsibility to see that appliances are serviced for shipment before they are loaded on the van. Upon request and for an additional charge, a moving company will perform this service, using either its own qualified personnel or an authorized service company.

Can I pack my china, glass and crystal?
Most people prefer to have their household possessions, especially fragile items, professionally packed by a moving company. However, if you decide to pack these items yourself, remember that the basic principles of good packing include wrapping the items individually, providing plenty of cushioning and making sure of a firm pack.

Be sure to select a sturdy container with a lid. Place a two- or three-inch layer of crushed paper on the bottom of the carton as a cushion. Wrap each item individually with a soft material to provide a safe, protective, “padded nest.” Pack the heaviest items on the bottom and the lighter ones next, filling in empty spaces with crushed paper. Place plates on edge and glassware on rims for maximum protection. Mark the carton “Fragile,” and list the contents on the outside. Be sure to seal the carton with tape.

Cartons, paper and tape may be purchased from your local Mayflower agent for a small fee. Also ask your agent for a copy of the free booklet “The Do-It-Yourself Packing Guide” or visiting our Packing Tips page.

Can I pack my clothes in a chest or dresser drawers?
Lightweight clothing – sweaters, shirts, blouses, and lingerie – may be left in the drawers. Do not fill drawers with heavy items such as books, table linens or sheets, which can damage the piece of furniture during transit. Be careful NOT to leave fragile items, money, jewelry, watches or other valuables in the drawers, as well as anything that might spill or leak. For more information on how to pack clothing, please visit the Packing Tips section of this Web site.

Items that we can't move
  • Can I move my frozen foods?
  • Can I move jewelry and other valuables?
  • Can I move my house plants?
  • Can I move my pet?
Can I move my frozen foods?
Frozen foods can be moved, but only under specific, limited conditions. Be sure to discuss this with your Mayflower agent. In most instances, we suggest that shipping arrangements be made through local frozen food locker plants, especially for a long-distance move. It is even easier just to use up the foods prior to the move or donate them to someone.

For a complete list of items that cannot be shipped, please visit the Non-Allowables section of this Web site.

Can I move jewelry and other valuables?
Items of extraordinary value such as jewelry, money, photographs, antiques and stamp collections can be included in your shipment, provided you notify your Mayflower agent of these items before packing or moving day. However, we strongly recommend that you carry irreplaceable and expensive articles with you, or make other arrangements for their transport.

In the moving industry, items worth more than $100 per pound are considered to be articles of “extraordinary” value. To be assured that a claim involving these articles is not limited to minimal liability, complete and sign the High-Value Inventory form and sign the “Extraordinary (Unusual) Value Article Declaration” box on the Bill of Lading. If no articles of extraordinary value are included in your shipment, simply write “none” on the High-Value Inventory form and sign it.

For a complete list of items that cannot be shipped, please visit the Non-Allowables section of this Web site.

Can I move my house plants?
Mayflower cannot accept responsibility for safely moving your plants, because they may suffer from a lack of water and light as well as probable temperature changes while in the van. You may prefer to transport your house plants in the family car or ship them by plane.

Some states prohibit the entry of all plants, while other states will admit plants under certain conditions; still others have no plant regulations. Be sure to check the regulations of the state to which you're moving.

For a complete list of items that cannot be shipped, please visit the Non-Allowables section of this Web site.

Can I move my pet?
Pets cannot be carried on the moving van. Dogs, cats, canaries and parakeets can usually be transported in the family car. If this isn't convenient, your Mayflower agent will be glad to suggest alternate ways to ship your pets safely.

For a complete list of items that cannot be shipped, please visit the Non-Allowables section of this Web site.


 

Not Allowable List


Items not to pack
Before your things are packed and loaded, please take some time to look over the items that we cannot put on a truck or in a container. Hazardous and perishable materials are not allowed, and we recommend that you keep sentimental or personally important items with you.

Hazardous materials
 
  • Aerosol cans
  • Ammonia
  • Ammunition
  • Car batteries
  • Charcoal/lighter fluid
  • Chemistry sets
  • Cleaning solvents
  • Darkroom chemicals
  • Fertilizer
  • Fire extinguishers
  • Fireworks
  • Fuels/oils
  • Household batteries
  • Kerosene
 
  • Liquid bleach
  • Loaded guns
  • Matches
  • Nail polish
  • Paint thinners
  • Paints/varnishes
  • Pesticides
  • Poisons
  • Pool chemicals
  • Propane tanks
  • Scuba tanks
  • Sterno fuel
  • Weed killer
 
Perishables
  • Food without adequate preservation
  • Frozen food
  • Open or half-used foods
  • Plants
  • Produce
  • Refrigerated foods
**If you are moving less than 150 miles and your items will be delivered within 24 hours of pickup, agents may agree to transport perishables that are properly packed and require no servicing in transit.

NOTE: You should empty your refrigerators and freezers and keep appliance doors open for at least 24 hours in advance of loading. This will allow appliances to dry out and prevent the growth of mold.

Personal importance/sentimental value
 
  • Address books
  • Airline tickets
  • Car titles
  • Cash
  • Cell phones
  • Checkbooks
  • Computer data files/backups
  • Family photographs/photo albums
  • Financial documents (stocks, bonds, CDs, IRAs, deeds, tax records
  • Home videos
 
  • Insurance policies
  • Jewelry and furs
  • Keys (car, furniture, new home)
  • Laptop computers
  • Medical/dental records
  • New home documents
  • Prescription medicine
  • Professional files/research projects
  • School records
 
 

Ten Most Forgotten Items


With more than 43 million Americans planning to move this year, odds are even the most organized may not remember every detail of a move — or every item. Remembering the “out of sight, out of mind” objects increases your success in moving all of your belongings. Mayflower suggests adding the following 10 points to the top of your preparation list:

  1. For the record — Obtain copies of your and your family's medical records, including any dental and vaccine/immunization information, as well as any veterinary records for the family pet. In some cases, a notarized letter is required to receive official documentation; you may need to contact the American Medical Records Association to determine your new state's needs. You might also consider transferring current prescriptions to a drugstore in your new town.Another record you'll want to be sure to have in hand is your child's permanent school record. School records are usually required when registering your child at his/her new school. Often, copies are not sufficient and require a raised seal
  2. Buried treasure — If you've hidden any valuables around the house, be sure to collect them before leaving. You should carry valuable items such as jewelry with you or keep them in a safe deposit box instead of packing them on the moving van.
  3. Old phone numbers – Pack phone books from your existing residence to take with you. You may think you'll remember the numbers you frequently call now, but more likely you'll spend a small fortune on directory assistance charges to contact old friends or tie up loose ends.
  4. Taken to the cleaners — Remember to collect all items that are being cleaned, stored or repaired (for example, dry cleaning, shoes, watches, etc.). Also, remember to return library books, movie rentals and anything else you may have checked out.
  5. What's your new address? — Keep your new address handy in your wallet or purse. In the flurry of preparing for a move, you may forget your new address — important information when forwarding periodicals, mail and credit card bills, as well as keeping in touch with old friends.
  6. Spic and span — Remember to leave out cleaning supplies for the final “once-over” before closing the door for good, or make arrangements in advance for a service to clean for you. To reduce the amount of things you take with you, if you are cleaning the home yourself, use up previously purchased cleaning products, and then throw away the empty containers when you leave.
  7. The opener — Many people often forget to take the electric garage door opener out of their automobile before leaving. Remember to leave the opener for the new residents.
  8. Remember “Rover” — In most cases, moving companies cannot transport animals or plants. Plan ahead and make arrangements for their safe transfer.
  9. Bank on it – It's wise to open a checking account in your new town about a month prior to your move so that you have immediate access to your funds. It enables you to have a little cash on hand for unexpected expenses. On occasion, retailers will decline to cash “out-of-town” checks.
  10. Keys to success – Remember the collection of spare house keys. Whether it means retrieving keys from neighbors or from under the rock next to the front door, don't forget to gather all sets before you depart.